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Alex Dowsett's UCI Hour Record attempt postponed

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Movistar todoay released the statement that most people were expecting - that Dowsett's attempt in the Hour Record, scheduled for February 27 - will be moved lo later date to secure the rider's full recovery - despite the earlier announcement that Alex had returned to training. Full statement follows.

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UCI Track Cycling World Cup III – Cali – Day 3; Session 2

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Men’s Sprint – Semifinals

The men’s sprint semifinals kicked off the final session of the 2014/5 Track World Cup. The might of the London round winner, Jeffrey Hoogland of the Netherlands, was no match for Maximilian Levy of Germany with Hoogland taking the win in both races.

The second match saw Denis Dmitriev of Rusvelo pitted against the home rider, Fabian Puerta. The loud, raucous support for the Puerta may have actually proved a distraction for the home rider who elected to save his energy and admit defeat in the first race after a strong attack from the three-time European champion saw Dmitriev triumph over Puerta. The second race was a closer affair, and Puerta appeared to have the advantage. However, a late surge by the Russian saw him edge across the line first and relegate Puerta to the bronze medal final.

Men’s Sprint – Semifinals – Riders Who Progress to Finals

Gold Medal Final

1 Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS
2 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO

Bronze Medal Final

1 Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA
2 Maximilian Levy GERMANY

Men’s Sprint – Race for 5th to 8th Place

Patrick Constable took his first sprint points of the World Cup with a win in the minor final, making the unpopular move of beating home rider, Anderson Parra, into second place. Shane Perkins of Jayco AIS took third, with Damien Zielinski of Poland taking eight – his highest position in all the World Cup rounds.

Men’s Sprint – Race for 5th to 8th Place – Results

5 Patrick CONSTABLE  AUSTRALIA
6 Anderson PARRA  COLOMBIA
7 Shane PERKINS  JAYCO AIS
8 Damien ZIELINSKI  POLAND

Men’s Sprint – Finals

One might have believed that the first of the finals, the ride for bronze, was for the gold such was the support for Puerta. The World Cup leader powered around the track to take the bronze medal from Levy in two straight race.

The final for gold was set to be a more competitive affair. Dmitriev, who had had a disappointing performance in London, was fired up to get his own back on the London round gold medallist, Hoogland. His campaign got off to the perfect start, taking the win in the first race. However, with Hoogland taking the win in a messy second race, the final had to be taken to a third, deciding, race. Dmitriev won the final round, winning him the gold medal.

Men’s Sprint – Finals - Results

Gold Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO
Silver Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS

Bronze Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA
4 Maximilian Levy GERMANY

Women’s Omnium VI – Points Race

The final event of the women’s omnium was the points race. Kirsten Wild of the Netherlands had a lead of 24 points going into the race; a comfortable lead, but not one which would guarantee victory. What was clear, however, was both Spanish rider Marlies Meijas Garcia and Wild would unseat the World Cup leader, Jolien d’Hoore after she had elected not to ride the Cali round.

Meijas was fifth overall going into the event, but with just 10 points separating her from the silver medal, she clearly had the potential to move up the medal rankings, particularly with her lethal short distance speed which she had used to perfection to win the previous two rounds of the omnium, the time trial and flying lap. Indeed, she was buoyed enough to take the first sprint, chalking up five points and overtaking fourth placed Simon Frapporti of Italy. Two points for Germany’s Anna Knauer, currently lying in silver, were crucial for her in her podium campaign.

Clearly unfatigued from her first effort, Meijas sprinted across the line first to take maximum points in the second sprint putting her within three points of Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro who was lying in bronze. Wild managed to grab a crucial point in this sprint to increase her lead to a quarter of a century from Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro of Spain.

Lotte Kopecky of Belgian used the opportunity created after the second sprint to break away from the bunch in an attempt to take a lap. Kopecky, lying in 12th place going into the points race, offered little threat to the competition leaders who let her take a lap within four laps.

Wild grabbed full points in the third sprint increasing her lead further but, disappointingly for her, it was second place Olaberria who was on her wheel and took three points. Neither riders featured in the fourth sprint, which saw maximum points claimed by Katarzyna Pawlowska of Poland who had quietly collected points in three of the four sprints so far. Knauer grabbed a crucial three points to forward her campaign for the silver medal.

Knauer’s campaign was to be shortlived, however: the next sprint saw Olaberria take maximum points and edge ahead of Knauer to the silver medal position. Wild earned another point with fourth place. Elizabeth Newell of the USA broke away from the bunch and, unchallenged, took a lap for 20 points. Although Newell’s lap would not trouble the leaders, for Newell it moved her up from 18th to 15th in the overall competition.

The leaders did not feature in the seventh sprint which was once again taken by Pawlowska who had arguably been the most impressive so far in the sprints for the points. Meijas managed to take full points in the eighth sprint meaning there were just three points separating second from fourth. Sadly for Meijas, Knauer managed to grab two points in the same sprint.

Olaberria took the ninth sprint to move into silver medal position from Knauer, with Wild taking second place meaning there was everything to play for in the final sprint. In the end, it was Xiao Juan Diao of Hong Kong who stole the maximum points and, with Mejias unable to challenge after feeling the exertions of her earlier efforts, Knauer grabbed a single point to cement her bronze medal.

Wild finished the race with the gold, which also put her as the overall winner of the World Cup competition. Olaberria was ecstatic with her three point cushion for silver, whilst Knauer would understandably be relieved to hang on to silver. Meijas would understandably be disappointed to finish in fourth, but some consolation would be gained from her silver medal in the overall World Cup omnium competition.

Women’s Omnium VI – Points Race – Total Omnium Points After Race

1 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS 190
2
Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro  SPAIN 169
3 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY 166
4
Marlies Mejias Garcia  SPAIN 163
5 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY 154
6 tamara BALABOLINA  Russia 137
7 Amalie DIDERIKSEN  DENMARK 134
8 Katarzyna PAWLOWSKA  POLAND 129
9 Racquel SHEATH  NEW ZEALAND 121
10 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA 120
11 L
otte KOPECKY  BELGIUM  SPAIN 110
12 Xiao Juan DIAO  HONG KONG 99
13
Soline LAMBOLEY  FRANCE 90
14 Yuanyuan TIAN  CHINA 80
15 E
lizabeth NEWELL  USA 70
16 Caroline RYAN  IRELAND 64
17
Lucie ZALESKA  CZECH REPUBLIC  56
18 Emily KAY  WALES 54
19
Sofia ARREOLA NAVARRO  MEXICO 50
20 Jupha SOMNET  MALAYSIA 41
21 Elissa WUNDERSITZ  AUSTRALIA 37
22 Katslaryna PIATROUSKAYA  BELARUS 31
21 Sakura TSUKAGOSHI  JAPAN DNF

Women’s Keirin – Second Round

Two heats of six riders lined up to contest the second round of the Keirin competition. In the first race, Lin Junhong of China made the early move, but it was Melissa Erickson of the USA who powered down the final straight to just pip Junhong on the line. Caitlin Ward of Australia grabbed the last final place in the first heat. The second heat was delayed due to a severe thunderstorm, but when racing resumed, Shuang Guo of Max Success Pro Cycling gave a clear demonstration as to why she is so far undefeated in the World Cup keirin competition. Taking to the front early on, Guo raced unchallenged to the line to take the win. Ekaterina Gnidenko of Russia took the second qualification spot, with Shanne Braspennincx of the Netherlands taking the final spot.

Women’s Keirin – Second Round – Qualifiers From Both Heats Through To Finals

1 Melissa ERICKSON  USA
2 Jin JUNHONG  CHINA
3 Caitlin WARD  AUSTRALIA
4 Shuang GUO  MAX PRO CYCLING TEAM
5 Ekaterina GNIDENKO  RUSSIA
6 Shanne BRASPENNINCX  NETHERLANDS

Women’s Keirin – Finals

The first Keirin final was for 7th to 12th place, and it was the reigning Asian Keirin champion, Wai Sze Lee from Hong Kong, who accelerated away from the bunch in the final lap to take the win by a convincing third of a second. Monique Sullivan of Canada took second place ahead of Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez of Cuba.

The gold medal final was the last event of the World Cup competition and, rather than finish in a blaze of glory for the gold medal winner, the race was marred by an accident at the bell which brought down Ekaterina Gnidenko of Russia and Caitlin Ward of Australia. Shuang Guo powered around to take the win, but was later relegated after deemed to be entering an opponent’s line. Lin Junghong of China was awarded with the win, albeit in far from ideal circumstances, with Shanne Braspennincx taking silver. Melissa Erickson took the bronze, with Gnidenko picking herself up to ride across the line for fourth place and Ward walking across the line for fifth.

Women’s Keirin – Finals - Results

Final for 1st to 6th place

1 Jin JUNHONG  CHINA Melissa ERICKSON  USA
2 Shanne BRASPENNINCX  NETHERLANDS
3 Melissa ERICKSON  USA
4 Ekaterina GNIDENKO  RUSSIA
5 Caitlin WARD  AUSTRALIA
6 Shuang GUO  MAX PRO CYCLING TEAM (REL)

Final for 7th to 12th place

7 Sze Wai LEE  HONG KONG
8 Monique SULLIVAN  CANADA
9 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA
10 Fatehah MUSTAPA  YSD TRACK TEAM
11 Juliana GAVIRIA  COLOMBIA
12 Tania CALVO BARBERO  SPAIN

Men’s Omnium VI – Points Race

The points race formed the last bunch race of the weekend and, with just eight points separating the top three riders – Cameron Karwowski of New Zealand, Maximilian Beyer of Germany and Tim Veldt of the Netherlands – everything was to play for, particularly with Jasper De Buyst of Belgium and Gael Suter of Switzerland snapping at the heels of the current medal holders. A gained lap could be the decider for victory between any of these riders.

The first set of sprint points went to the Spaniard, Unai Elorriaga Zubiaur, with De Buyst grabbing a vital two points for second place. Raman Tsishkou of Belarus then took the opportunity to take a lap, his charge unchallenged due to being safely down the leaderboard. Casper Pedersen of Denmark took maximum points in the next set, the sixth-placed Dane having an outside chance of a podium if he could gain some laps in the race. However, with both Suter and Veldt also grabbing points, it would not prove an easy task.

Irish rider Martyn Irvine had his first moment of glory of the weekend, taking maximum points in the third sprint, with Beyer gratefully taking the three points for second place putting him in the gold medal position ahead of Karwowski. After the fifth and sixth sprint laps, which left the standings unaffected, a large group of six riders – which included Elorriaga – broke away from the bunch to take a lap.

The seventh sprint lap turned out to be a crucial lap: Jasper De Buyst grabbed the full five points to put him in the silver medal position, with Levy extending his lead with a further three points. With the eighth sprint lap not affecting the lead standings, De Buyst and Beyer take the opportunity to gain a lap in an attempt to further cement their top two positions. Karwowski was losing ground fast and, now lying in a far from safe bronze position, needed to gain more points to be sure of a podium spot.

The situation became even worse for Karwowski when Veldt took five points in the tenth sprint lap to put him within three points of the gold medal. Suter gained a vital three points in the same sprint.

Pedersen grabbed more points in the thirteenth sprint lap and soon made an attempt to take another lap which would have shaken the top of the table, but found himself unable to break away. With another lap gained by De Buyst and Beyer, the gold and silver places seemed a certainty with just 10 laps remaining.

Veldt took the penultimate sprint points to put him in fourth place, unseating Karwowski from the podium. However, it was Beyer who took off from the rest of the field in the final lap and took a convincing – and ecstatic – win, with Irvine crossing the line in second place. With none of the other podium contenders gaining points in the final sprint, the bronze medal was won by Suter – just three points ahead of Veldt and five from Thomas Boudat of France, whose three laps gained during the race had propelled him from ninth to fifth. Karwowski would undoubtedly be disappointed to be shunted down to sixth place; his failure to gain any laps during the race proving costly.

Men’s Omnium VI – Points Race – Total Omnium Points After Race

Gold Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY 220
Silver Jasper DE BUYST  BELGIUM 206
Bronze Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND 178
4 Tim Veldt  NETHERLANDS 175
5 Thomas BOUDAT  FRANCE 172
6 Cameron KARWOWSKI  NEW ZEALAND 170
7 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK 167
8 Raman TSHISHKOU  BELARUS 149
9 Viktor MANAKOV  RUSSIA 147
10 Chun Wing LEUNG  HONG KONG 145
11 Hao LIU  CHINA 142
12 Unai ELORRIAGA ZUBIAUR  SPAIN 133
13 Sam WELSFORD  AUSTRALIA 103
14 Oliver WOOD  GREAT BRITAIN 92
15 Sebastian MOLANO  COLOMBIA 87
16 Martyn IRVINE  IRELAND 77
17 Kazushige KUBOKI  JAPAN 75
18 Simone CONSONNI  ITALY 69
19 Ignacio SARABIA DIAZ  MEXICO 68
20 Ondrej RYBIN  CZECH REPUBLIC 64
21 Jacob DUEHRING  USA 62
22 Ioannis SPANOPOULOS  GREECE 60
23 Gideoni MONTEIRO  BRAZIL 48
24 Timur GUMEROV  UZBEKHISTAN 7 
 

UCI Track Cycling World Cup III – Cali – Day 3; Session 1

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Women’s Omnium IV – 500m Time Trial

The second day of the women’s omnium opened with the 500m time trial. Kirsten Wild was in the lead in the competition overnight, although the time trial is never Wild’s forte. In the absence of the overall World Cup omnium leader, Jolien d’Hoore, the attention would instead by diverted to the Cuban rider, Marlies Mejias Garcia, who had posted 35 second times in previous events, and beat Laura Trott into second place in the time trial in the London World Cup round.

It was the Russian rider, Tamara Balabolina, who was first to post a 35 second time. The reigning U23 omnium champion posted a fast time of 35.740. Meijias Garcia, up in the following heat, was able to respond to the challenge set by Balabolina, and rode nearly half a second faster in her heat to set the new mark at 35.337.

Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro of Spain was the only other rider to dip below 36 seconds, her time of 35.970 good enough to take third place in the time trial.

The leading duo, Kirsten Wild and Simona Frapporti, were unable to challenge the leadership spots. Wild could only muster up a time of 36.448 for ninth place, whilst Frapporti took fifth place with a time of 36.104.

Women’s Omnium IV – 500m Time Trial – Results

1 Marlies Mejias Garcia  SPAIN 35.337
2 tamara BALABOLINA  Russia 35.740
3 Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro  SPAIN 35.970
4 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY 36.073
5 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY 36.104
6 Soline LAMBOLEY  FRANCE 36.209
7 Yuanyuan TIAN  CHINA 36.271
8 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA 36.346
9 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS 36.448
10 Racquel SHEATH  NEW ZEALAND 36.757

Women’s Omnium V – Flying Lap

In the London round of the World Cup, Kirsten Wild put in a fast time of 14.377 to finish just a hundredth of a second behind the omnium leader, Jolien d’Hoore. Meijas Garcia, who has been excelling at the sprint events in Cali, finished in seventh place. Could Meijas Garcia translate this new found speed to beat Wild in Cali?

Xiao Juan Diao, who finished a hundredth of a second behind Laura Trott in London, was the first rider to dip under 15 seconds in Cali – and did so by quite some distance, crossing the line in 14.502. Meijas, who had been beaten comfortably by Diao in London, showed how much she has improved over the course of a month and lowered the bar to 14.290 – a time which would have earned her victory in the event in London. With Olaberria and Knauer clocking times of 14.436 and 14.686 respectively, all eyes were on Wild in the final heat.

Wild’s rode a 8.574 second first lap (behind Garcia) and, despite producing a faster second lap, was unable to beat Garcia’s time, posting a still highly respectable time of 14.346.

Women’s Omnium IV – 500m Time Trial – Results

1 Marlies Mejias Garcia  SPAIN 14.290
2 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS 14.346
3 Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro  SPAIN 14.436
4 Xiao Juan DIAO  HONG KONG 14.502
5 Katazyna PAWLOWSKA  POLAND 14.596
6 tamara BALABOLINA  Russia 14.637
7 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY 14.686
8 Elizabeth NEWELL  USA 14.854
9 Amalie DIDERIKSEN  DENMARK 14.858
10 Ausrine TREBAIT  LITHUANIA  14.864

Women’s Omnium IV – 500m Time Trial – Results

1 Marlies Mejias Garcia  SPAIN 35.337
2 tamara BALABOLINA  Russia 35.740
3 Leire Olaberria Dorronsoro  SPAIN 35.970
4 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY 36.073
5 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY 36.104
6 Soline LAMBOLEY  FRANCE 36.209
7 Yuanyuan TIAN  CHINA 36.271
8 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA 36.346
9 Kirsten WILD  NETHERALNDS 36.448
10 Racquel SHEATH  NEW ZEALAND 36.757

Women’s Keirin – First Round

26 riders were split between four teams, and the first heat saw Caitlin Ward of Australia and Tania Calvo Barbero of Spain sail through to the second round. Monique Sullivan of Canada, who holds three Pan Am titles and Fatehah Mustapa of the YSD Track Team were the pair who managed to avoid the repechages from the second heat.

The reigning World Cup champion, Shuang Guo, had no problem dismissing the competition in the third heat, and, much to the delight of the crowd, will be joined in the second round by Juliana Gaviria of Colombia. The gold medallist in the Asian Games, Wai Sze Lee of Hong Kong, took the win in the final heat, taking Ekaterina Gnidenko of Russia through to the second round with her.

There were two notable riders who were despatched to the repechages: Jessica Varnish, who finish fifth in the London round and was lying in sixth overall, narrowly missed qualifying from the final heat and Hyejin Lee of Korea, who took second place in London and was lying in seventh overall, finished last in the third heat.

Women’s Keirin – First Round – Qualifiers From Each Heat Through To Second Round

1 Caitlin WARD  AUSTRALIA
2 Tania CALVO BARBERO  SPAIN
3 Monique SULLIVAN  CANADA
4 Fatehah MUSTAPA  YSD TRACK TEAM
5 Shuang GUO  MAX PRO CYCLING TEAM
6 Juliana GAVIRIA  COLOMBIA
7 Wai Sze  HONG KONG
8 Ekaterina GNIDENKO  RUSSIA

Women’s Keirin – First Round Repechages  

The first of the repechage heats went to a buoyant Melissa Erickson of the USA, with Shanne Braspennincx of the Netherlands victorious in the second heat. Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez OF Cuba dismissed Hyejin Lee in the third heat, with Jessica Varnish suffering a similar humbling from Jin Junghong of China in the final heat.

Women’s Keirin – First Round Repechages  – Qualifiers From Each Heat Through To Second Round

1 Melissa ERICKSON  USA
2 Shanne Braspennincx  NETHERLANDS
3 Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez  CUBA
4 Lin JUNHONG  CHINA

Men’s Sprint – Qualifying

A huge field of 39 riders were on the startsheet for the sprint qualifying. The home support for Fabian Hernando Puerta Zapata would undoubtedly be huge, particularly being buoyed by his victory in the Keirin event the previous evening. Puerta had finished third in Guadalajara, and second in London so a win would be the natural progression. However, with Jeffrey Hoogland of the Netherlands also riding, the progression would be far from easy. Hoogland triumphed over Puerta in London, and would undoubtedly be keen to do the double in Cali. There would also be competition from Sam Webster, the well-medalled New Zealand rider, the bronze medal winner from the London round, Hersony Canelon of Venezuela and stalwarts of the sprint scene such as Gregory Bauge. Francois Pervis was a notable absentee on the startsheet, his accident in the keirin clearly more serious than it appeared at the time.

However, it was British rider Lewis Oliva, who was the first to post a 10.0x time on the board. Oliva crossed the line in 10.079, a time which teammate Matt Crampton was unable to surpass, riding 10.221 with qualification to the 1/16 finals in the balance. In the end, it took until the 20th rider, Erik Balzer, for the time to be beaten. The German posted a time of 10.023 to take top spot.

However, it was the Rusvelo rider, Denis Dmitriev, who was the first to raise eyebrows with a sub-10 second ride. Dmitriev certainly had the credentials to put it in a good ride with a collection of European and national titles, as well as the bronze medal from the world championships in Cali a year ago. Dmitriev posted a time of 9.982, putting the pressure on Puerta and Hoogland to replicated this. Off second from last, Hoogland duly did, writing 9.871 to go a tenth of a second faster than Dmitriev. Puerta also posted a sub-10 second time (9.980) but it was Hoogland who qualified as the fastest rider.

Men’s Sprint – Qualifying – Results

1 Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS 9.871
2 Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA 9.980
3 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO 9.982
4 Erik BALZER  GERMANY 10.023
5 Huge HAAK  NETHERLANDS 10.034
6 Damien ZIELINSKI  POLAND 10.048
7 Juan PERALTA GASCON  SPAIN 10.066
8 Hersony CANELON  VENEZUELA 10.075
9 Lewis Alexander OLIVA  GREAT BRITAIN 10.079
10 Shane PERKINS  JAYCO AIS 10.085
11 Gregory BAUGE  FRANCE 10.089
12 Seiichiro NAKAGAWA  JAPAN 10.105
13 Pavel KELEMEN  CZECH REPUBLIC 10.117
14 Kevin SIREAU  FRANCE 10.118
15 Chao XU  CHINA 10.125
16 Patrick CONSTABLE  AUSTRALIA 10.130
17 Joseph VELOCE  CANADA 10.144
18 Jair TJON EN FA  SURINAME 10.149
19 Adam PTACNIK  CZECH REPUBLIC 10.178
20 Maximilian Levy GERMANY 10.178
21 Anderson PARRA  COLOMBIA 10.206
22 Matthew CRAMPTON  GREAT BRITAIN 10.221
23 Tomoyuki KAWABATA  JAPAN PRO CYCLING TEAM 10.222
24 Huge BARRETTE  CANADA 10.241

Men’s Sprint – 1/16TH Finals

The winners of the 12 heats in the 1/16th finals would go through to the 1/8th finals and, with the times so close in the qualifying heats, competition would undoubtedly be fierce. The first three heats went on form, with both Hoogland, Puerta and Dmitriev safely through. The first surprise was Anderson Parra overcoming the talented German rider, Erik Balzer, in the fourth heat. The raucous home support was perhaps enough to see the Colombian cross the line some four-hundredths of a second ahead of his competition. Any hopes for British representation in the 1/8th finals were dashed, with both Oliva and Crampton taken out of the competition by their heat compatriates.

Men’s Sprint – 1/16TH Finals – Heat Winners Who Progress to 1/8th Finals

1 Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS
2 Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA
3 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO
4 Anderson PARRA  COLOMBIA
5 Maximilian Levy GERMANY
6 Damien ZIELINSKI  POLAND
7 Jair TJON EN FA  SURINAME
8 Hersony CANELON  VENEZUELA
9 Patrick CONSTABLE  AUSTRALIA
10 Shane PERKINS  JAYCO AIS
11 Gregory BAUGE  FRANCE
12 Pavel KELEMEN  CZECH REPUBLIC

Men’s Sprint – 1/8TH Finals

The 1/8th finals went entirely to form, with the fastest six from the 1/16th final all qualifying for the quarter finals. Hersony Canelon from Venezuela was relegated due to blocking his opponent, Maximilian Levy. Gregory Bauge was one of those who was discharged to the repechages – by Puerta, and in the biggest margin of this round.

Men’s Sprint – 1/8TH Finals – Heat Winners Who Progress to Quarter Finals

1 Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS
2 Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA
3 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO
4 Anderson PARRA  COLOMBIA
5 Maximilian Levy GERMANY
6 Damien ZIELINSKI  POLAND

Men’s Sprint – 1/8TH Finals Repechages

Patrick Constable of Australia took a fairly calculated win in the first of two repechages heats, with Shane Perkins of Australia dismissing Hersony Canelon of Venezuela in a photo finish. Gregory Bauge’s sprint campaign was over after finishing last in his repechage heat.

Men’s Sprint – 1/8TH Finals Repechages – Heat Winners Who Progress to Quarter Finals

1 Patrick CONSTABLE  AUSTRALIA
2 Shane PERKINS  JAYCO AIS

Men’s Sprint – Quarter Finals

The first of the heats saw Hoogland take a fairly straightforward win against Perkins, with Fabian Puerta taking the second heat in a tight finish with Constable. The third heat became the most tactical of the competition so far, with both riders track standing and trying to outwit their competition. Dmitriev eventually took the victory, with Levy comfortably winning the fourth heat from Parra.

The second races all went the same way, with none having to go into a fourth decider. So, the favourites, Hoogland and Puerta, were both safely through to the semi-finals and would be joined by Dmitriev and Levy.

Men’s Sprint – Quarter Finals – Final Who Progress to Semifinals

1 Jeffrey HOOGLAND  NETHERLANDS
2 Fabian Hernando PUERTA ZAPATA  COLOMBIA
3 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO
4 Maximilian Levy GERMANY

Men’s Omnium IV – 1km Time Trial

Germany’s Maximilian Beyer was leading the men’s omnium overnight, but like Kirsten Wild in the ladies’ event, the kilo was no Beyer’s speciality. The biggest threat was likely to come from Cameron Karwowski of New Zealand: Karwowski, bronze medallist in the kilo in the New Zealand national championships for the past two years, had finished second in the time trial in the Guadalajara round, posting 61 seconds for the four laps.

The riders were seeded into 12 heats, and it took nine heats to unearth the first rider to ride a sub 1:04 time. Hao Liu of China posted a time of 1:03.291 in his heat to set the bar lower from the previous best time by Viktor Manakov; a 1:04.073 in the seventh heat.

Liu opened the floodgates for more fast rides, with Gael Suter riding 1:02.902 in the following heat against Casper Pedersen’s 1:03.911. It was the penultimate heat which contained the talent of Karwowski. Karwowski was up against Tim Veldt who had already demonstrated his aptitude for the kilometre event in preceding rounds. After taking the lead on the first lap, Karwowski never looked back: riding two 13 second laps in the middle of the race (the only rider to clock a 13 second lap in the event), Karwowski crossed the line in 1:01.921 against Weldt’s 1:02.816.

The final lap, containing Beyer and Jasper de Buyst, ended up being a rather unremarkable affair, with Beyer clocking 1:04.293 for ninth place with De Buyst producing a 1:03.935 for sixth. However, Beyer’s 9th position was enough to keep him in the gold medal spot.

Men’s Omnium IV – 1km Time Trial – Results

1 Cameron KARWOWSKI  NEW ZEALAND 1:01.921
2 Tim VELDT  NETHERLANDS 1:02.818
3 Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND 1:02.902
4 Hao LIU  CHINA 1:03.291
5 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK 1:03.911
6 Jasper DE BUYST  BELGIUM 1:03.935
7 Viktor MANAKOV  RUSSIA 1:04.073
8 Raman TSISHKOU  BELARUS  1:04.200
9 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY 1:04.293
10 Thomas BOUDAT  FRANCE 1:04.309

Men’s Omnium V – Flying Lap

The final event of the night was the flying lap. Historically, Tim Veldt has performed well in this event, as has Casper Pedersen of Denmark. However, with Cameron Karkowski also in contention in Cali, the competition would undoubtedly be fierce.

Sam Welsford of Australia was the first rider to duck beneath 13.5 seconds, setting the benchmark at 13.287 after just three heats. Pedersen was unable to better Welsford’s time, clocking 13.356, with Gael Suter of Switzerland eventually bettering Welford’s time to 13.247 with just four riders remaining.

Veldt immediately bettered Suter’s time in the next heat, clocking 13.461. De Buyst could only muster up a 13.461 but, as predicted, Karkowski powered around the track to clock the fastest time so far (13.142) with just Beyer remaining. Beyer is not renowned for his performance in the flying lap, and tonight turned out to be no exception as he crossed the line in 13.466 for his second ninth place in a row. Beyer would now need a solid performance in the points race to confirm his lead.

Men’s Omnium V – Flying Lap – Results

1 Cameron KARWOWSKI  NEW ZEALAND 13.142
2 Tim VELDT  NETHERLANDS 13.152
3 Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND 13.247
4 Sam WELSFORD  AUSTRALIA 13.287
5 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK 13.356
6 Ionnis SPANOPOULOS  GREECE 13.405
7 Simone CONSONNI  ITALY 13.421
8 Jasper DE BUYST  BELGIUM 13.461
9 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY 13.466
10 Viktor MANAKOV  13.499 
 

UCI Track Cycling World Cup III – Cali – Day 2; Session 2

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Women’s Team Sprint – Finals

The first event of the second session of the day – which started barely minutes after the close of the first session – was the finals of the team sprint competition. The Russian duo of Daria Schmeleva and Ekaterina Gnidenko were set to contest the gold against the Dutch pairing of Elis Ligtlee and Shanne Braspennincx. The bronze match had Spaniards Tania Calvo Barbero and Helena Casas Roige pitted against Katie Schofield and Natasha Hansen from New Zealand. The British pairing of Katy Marchant and Jessica Varnish had heartbreakingly lost out on qualifying for the finals by just two hundredths of a second.

The match for bronze was first off, and Spain were the favourites on paper finished ahead of New Zealand in the two preceeding rounds as well as boasting a faster qualifying time. In the end, a fast opening lap by Barbero (18.95s) was enough to put Spain in the lead from the offset, and the pair crossed the line in 33.356, a clear 0.7 seconds ahead of their Antipodean competition (34.028 seconds).

Russia had consistently finished in silver medal position in the two preceding rounds of the World Cup and this match represented their best chance to collect the gold. Despite Ligtlee’s individual sprinting talent, the pair had not so far managed to translate this into the same success in the team event. Schmeleva, who had won triple gold in the time trial, Keirin and sprint at the 2012 junior world championships, opened with a fast 18.661 opening lap against a fairly steady 19.022 from Ligtlee. Gnidenko increased Russia’s advantage in the second lap, and the pair crossed the line in 32.982 against the Dutch mark of 33.586. Russia took their first gold of the World Cup series and, with it, the win in the World Cup series.

Women’s Team Sprint – Finals – Results

Final for Gold

Gold RUSSIA (Daria Schmeleva, Ekaterina Gnidenko) 32.982
Silver NETHERLANDS (Elis Ligtlee, Shanne Braspennincx) 33.586

Final for Bronze

Bronze SPAIN (Tania Calvo Barbero, Helena Casas Roige) 33.356
4 NEW ZEALAND (Katie Schofield, Natasha Hansen) 34.028

Women’s Team Pursuit – Finals

Unlike the team sprint, the team pursuit had a two additional finals for 7th to 8th and 5th to 6th positions. The first match saw New Zealand pitted against Hong Kong. New Zealand had been the slowest team in the first round, whilst Hong Kong had qualified for one of the gold medal qualifying heats so were undoubtedly the favourites. The event went to form: although New Zealand had a faster opening lap, the Hong Kong quartet consistently took time out of the Kiwis on each lap, eventually catching the team in the final lap to take seventh place.

The match for 5th and 6th was a painstakingly close affair: Belarus found themselves ahead for the first three kilometres, but paid for the early enthusiasm: the ordered German quartet held their speed well to the line, taking 2.5 seconds out of the Belarussians in the final kilometre to take fifth place in 4:35.423 against the Belarussians’ 4:37.992.

The bronze medal ride-off saw the Italian team – who had been second fastest in qualifying – face the United States who had put in a storming ride of 4:29 in the first round to qualify for the finals second fastest. The Americans were able to consolidate their first round performance with an excellent display of team pursuiting in the final round, the Italians paying for an overenthusiastic start. The US-team, who only dropped to a 17 second lap in the final lap, took the bronze medal in 4:32.482 against the Italians’ 4:35.776.

Italy got the consolation of qualifying for the final by posting the fourth fastest qualifying time whilst a much improved United States team who were in the unenviable position of starting first took the second spot in the bronze medal final with a fast time of 4:29.904 – eleven seconds faster than their qualifying time the previous evening.

The gold medal final saw the Chinese team take the advantage for the first three kilometres, holding a consistent half second advantage. However, the experience of the young Australian team, three of whom were reigning junior champions in the discipline, saw them claw back the lead in the final kilometre with China fading badly after losing their fourth rider, Di Jin. The Australians took the title in 4:31.527 against the Chinese time of 4:34.105.

The absence of the Great Britain team, who had won the previous two rounds, meant the Australians took the win in the World Cup competition and, in doing so, set a warning to the world that their development team is already in shape to take on the best in the world.

Women’s Team Pursuit – Finals - Results

Final for Gold

Gold AUSTRALIA (Macey STEWART, Elissa WUNDERSITZ, Alexandra MANLY, Lauren PERRY) 4:31.527
Silver CHINA (Dong Yan HUANG, Di JIN, Hongyu LIANG, Zhao BAOFANG) 4:34.105

Final for Bronze

Bronze UNITED STATES (Carmen SMALL, Lauren TAMAYO, Jennifer VALENTE, Ruth WINDER) 4:32.482
4 ITALY (FRAPPORTI Simona, Beatrice BARTELLONI, Tatiana GUDERZO, Silva VALSECCHI) 4:35.776

5 GERMANY 4:35.423
6 BELARUS 4:37.992
7 HONG KONG 4:32.293
8 NEW ZEALAND

Women’s Individual Sprint – Final for 5th to 8th Places

Two of the four riders in the minor final were British: Victoria Williamson and Jessica Varnish. With the talented Cuban rider, Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez, relegated due to entering her opponents’ line, it was reigning Azerbaijan national champion, Olga Ismayilova, who took the win to claim fifth place, with Williamson triumphing against her teammate for second place.

Women’s Individual Sprint – Final for 5th to 8th Places - Results

5 Olga ISMAYILOVA  AZERBAIJAN
6 Victoria WILLIAMSON  GREAT BRITAIN
7 Jessica VARNISH  GREAT BRITAIN
8 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA (REL)

Women’s Individual Sprint – Semi-Finals

Just two rounds were needed in both semifinals to secure qualification to the gold medal final for Elis Ligtlee of the Netherlands and Shuang Guo of Max Success Pro Cycling. With just seven points separating the pair in the World Cup standings, the final would undoubtedly be an exciting race.

Women’s Individual Sprint - Semi Finals – Heat Winners Progressing to Finals

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING

Women’s Individual Sprint – Finals

Just two rounds were needed to decide both the gold and bronze medal finals: a delighted Ligtlee triumphed against Guo in both rounds, Wai Sze Lee was able to claim bronze in both races despite a hard fought battle by Sandie Clair of France.

Ligtlee’s victory was enough to propel into the gold medal spot in the World Cup overall competition, finishing with 383 points against Guo’s 375. Lee took the bronze medal in the overall competition.

Women’s Individual Sprint – Finals – Results

For Gold

Gold Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
Silver Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING

For Bronze

Bronze Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG
4 Sandie CLAIR  FRANCE

Women’s Omnium III – Elimination Race

A serious crash at the back of the race in the early stages took many riders out, including Ireland’s Caroline Ryan. The race was immediately neutralised and, with all riders back on their bikes, was ultimately restarted. The Mexican rider who had an outside chance of claiming the World Cup omnium title was the fourth rider to be eliminated whilst Balabolina, who had shone in the individual pursuit the previous evening, was also out halfway through the race.

The final three riders left in the race were competition leaders, Kirsten Wild and Simona Frapporti, together with Soline Lamboley of France who had yet to feature prominently in the competition so far. The silver medallist in the 2013 world championships and four-time French champion, powered ahead of her competition in the final straight to take the win, with Wild having to settle for second place and Frapporti third.

Women’s Omnium III – Elimination Race Results

1 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS
2 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY
3 Soline LAMBOLEY  FRANCE
4 Katarzyna PAWLOWSKA
5 Lotte KOPECKY BELGIUM
6 Amalie DIDERIKSEN  DENMARK
7 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY
8 Racquel SHEATH  NETHERLANDS
9 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA
10 Leire OLABERRIA DORRONSORO  SPAIN

Men’s Team Sprint - Finals

The bronze medal ride was the first of the finals to be held which saw the Polish team of Grzegorz Drejgier, Damian Zielinski and Krzysztof Maksel line up against the Japanese trio of Kazuki Amagai, Kazunari Watanbe and Seiichiro Nakagawa. The Polish team were riding a new team formation  in the Cali round of the world cup and the new formation paid off with the trio crossing the line in 43.907 with Maksel’s final lap of 13.341 ultimately ending up as faster than any of those in the gold medal match.

With Francois Pervis absent from the French trio in the gold medal final due to the morning’s crash in the keirin race, Kevin Sireau had the tall order of filling Pervis’ shoes. The Dutch team had already got the advantage going into the race, the team of Jeffrey Hoogland, Hugo Haak and Matthijs Buchi clocking the fastest time in qualifying. Both teams were started perfectly by Bauge and Hoogland, but it was Pervis’ replacement, Sireau, who managed to claw a third of a second into the Dutch in the second lap, who was ultimately responsible for the team taking the gold medal. The French crossed the line in 43.634 against the Dutch time of 43.816.

Men’s Team Sprint – Finals - Results

Final for Gold

Gold France (Gregory BAUGE, Kevin SIREAU, Quentin LAFARGUE) 43.634
Silver NETHERLANDS (Jeffrey HOOGLAND, Hugo haak, Matthijs BUCHLI) 44.090

Final for Bronze

Bronze Poland (Grzegorz DREJGIER, Damian ZIELINSKI, Krzysztof MAKSEL) 43.907
4 JAPAN (Kazuki AMAGAI, Kazunari WATANABI, Seiichiro NAKAGAWA) 44.975

Men’s Team Pursuit – Finals

Russia were piitted against Belgium for the first final for seventh place, and it was the Russians who immediately appeared to take command of the race and, with 500m remaining had a near two second advantage. However, the Russian team fell apart in the final 500m, their 16.718s penultimate lap allowing the Belgians to get ahead. A 15 second lap was enough to cement the win in the final lap, with the Belgians crossing the line in 4:09.221 against the Russians’ 4:09.418.

The final for fifth place saw Germany lined up against Spain. Germany had performed particularly well in the qualifying heats, and narrowly missed qualifying for the gold medal final. Despite a credible fight for the first 3000m, Spain eventually succumbed to the might of the experienced German squad who crossed the line in 4:05.307 against the Spaniards 4:07.455.

The final for gold had the potential to be the closest final of the four, with the Danish team who had been painstakingly close to reaching the gold medal final pitted against the British development squad team who had posted the second fastest time behind Rusvelo in the previous round. It was the Danes who had the advantage for the first 3000m, although, as predicted, were unable to power away to anything more than a 0.6 second advantage. A 14 second lap at 3000m propelled the British quartet into the lead, and they were able to increase their advantage right through to the line, eventually finishing in 4:05.391 against the Danes’ 4:05.826.

The gold medal final was another closely fought affair, with the trade team Rusvelo competing against a young Australian squad. The match was difficult to call throughout, with the Australians marginally ahead for the first 3000m. However, a slight lapse in formation was enough to give the Russian team the advantage. However, the Russians’ burst of speed cost them dearly and they faded badly in the final kilometre to allow an ecstatic Australian team to cross the line first in 4:03.200 against Rusvelo’s time of 4:04.229.

However, Great Britain’s bronze medal was enough to allow them to win the overall World Cup competition, finishing just 30 points ahead of the Australians. Denmark took third place.

Men’s Team Pursuit – Finals - Results

Final for Gold

Gold AUSTRALIA (Scott LAW, Joshua HARRISON, Jackson LAW, Tirian MCMANUS) 4:03.200
Silver RUSVELO (Artur ERSHOV, Alexander EVTUSHENKO, Alexey KURBATOV, Alexander SEROV) 4:04.229

Final for Bronze

Bronze GREAT BRITAIN (Germain BURTON, Matthew GIBSON, Christopher LATHAM, Mark STEWART) 4:05.931
4 DENMARK (Daniel HARTVIG, Anders HOLM, Rasmus Christian QUAADE, Casper VAN FOLSACH) 4:05.826

Remaining teams in time order:

5 GERMANY 4:05.307
6 SPAIN 4:07.455
7 BELGIUM 4:09.221
8 RUSSIA 4:09.418

Men’s Omnium III – Elimination Race

The last event of the night, which was now running severely late, was the elimination event in the men’s omnium event. Tim Veldt of the Netherlands, the current leader in the Cali competition, was taken out early on in the event and, despite getting back into the field, was unable to sustain the pace and ended up being the eighth rider to be eliminated. One of Veldt’s major competitors, also exited with 10 riders still remaining but it was now Maximilian Beyer of Germany who posed the biggest threat to Veldt’s lead.

Casper Pedersen of Denmark was the fifth last rider to be eliminated, whilst Oliver Wood of Great Britain put in an excellent ride to finish in fourth. The loud Colombian support was not enough to stop the Colombian Sebastian Molano being eliminated third from last.

The final lap was to be contested by Thomas Boudat and Beyer. An excellent final lap by Beyer saw him take the victory – and the overall lead in the competition overnight.

Men’s Omnium III – Elimination Race Results

1 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY
2 Thomas BOUDAT  FRANCE
3 Sebastian MOLANO  COLOMBIA
4 Oliver WOOD  GREAT BRITAIN
5 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK
6 Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND
7 Viktor MANAKOV  RUSSIA
8 Ondrej RYBIN  CZECH REPUBLIC
9 Hao LIU  CHINA
10 Jasper DE BUYST BELGIUM

 

UCI Track Cycling World Cup III – Cali – Day 2; Session 1

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Women’s Omnium I – 10km Scratch Race

Day two opened with the women’s omnium event. With neither World Cup leader, Jolien D’Hoore (BEL) or winner from the London round, Laura Trott (GBR), riding in Cali, the attention would revert to Marlies Mejias Garcia of Cuba. Garcia currently stands in second place in the overall World Cup standings, and needs just 45 points to draw level with D’Hoore. Kirsten Wild of the Netherlands, currently in fourth place, should also prove a force to be reckoned with.

The first event in the omnium competition was the 10-lap scratch race. Seeing her opportunity to take the lead in the World Cup competition, it was Wild who took the field by surprise with three laps remaining. The rider has graced the podium for the past seven years in the Dutch national individual pursuit championship, and used this ability to hold her advantage for the final three laps to cross the line first. Italian time trial and omnium champion, Simona Frapporti (ITA), took second place and Anna Knauer (GER) finished in third place. Wild’s closest rival, Garcia, could only manage sixth spot.

Women’s Omnium I – 10km Scratch Race Results

1 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS
2 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY
3 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY
4 Racquel SHEATH  NETHERLANDS
5 Leire OLABERRIA DORRONSORO  SPAIN
6 Marlies MEJIAS GARCIA  CUBA
7 Jupha SOMNET MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
8 Emily KAY  WALES
9 Caroline RYAN  IRELAND
10 Lotte KOPECKY BELGIUM

Women’s Omnium II – 3km Pursuit

The heats were, as usual, seeded in reverse order to the standings after the scratch race. The first rider to break the 3:40 barrier was the Russian rider, Tamara Balabolina, in the fifth heat. Balabolina, who is part of the team who hold the Russian team pursuit record, rode a sensible race to clock a time of 3:38.595 which would undoubtedly unnerve those who were further up the leaderboard. The Danish rider, Amalie Dideriksen, was the next to come close to challenging Balabolina’s time. A consistent race which only saw her slow notably in the final lap which undoubtedly cost her stealing the virtual lead, her final time just a tenth of a second slower than Balabolina (3:38.696).

Irish rider Caroline Ryan clocked a respectable 3:41.157, whilst 19 year old Emily Kay of Wales managed a time of 3:44.360. However, it was Kirsten Wild who put on a fine display of pursuiting to steal the second round of the competition with a time of 3:35.133 – with barely a fade noticeable in her lap splits. Second-placed Simona Frapporti, pitted against Wild in the final heat, could only manage 3:41.361 – a time good enough for ninth place.

Women’s Omnium II – 3km Pursuit Results

1 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS 3:35.133
2 Tamara BALABOLINA  RUSSIA 3:38.595
3 Amalie DIDERIKSEN  DENMARK 3:38.696
4 Marlies MEIJIAS GARCIA  CUBA 3:39.540
5 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY 3:40.009
6 Leire OLABERRIA DORRONSORO  SPAIN 3:40.702
7 Caroline RYAN  IRELAND 3:41.157
8 Sofia ARREOLA NAVARRO  MEXICO 3:41.316
9 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY 3:41.361
10 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA 3:41.875

Women’s Individual Sprint - Qualifying

Next on the schedule were the women’s sprint heats. 32 riders were on the startsheet, with 24 going through to the 1/16 finals. Germany’s Doreen Heinze was the first rider in the qualifiers, and set the bar at a fairly modest 11.923. Victoria Tyumneva (RUS) was the first rider to post a time closer to 11 seconds rather than 12, her 11.131 time suggesting she was performing significantly better than her early heat time suggested.

Canada’s Monique Sullivan was the next rider to cause heads to turn. Off as the 20th rider, the Commonwealth bronze medallist powered around the track and miss going under 11 seconds by just 0.7 seconds, stopping the clock with an impressive time of 11.069 – a clear demonstration as to why Sullivan is the Canadian 200m TT national record holder.

Shuang Guo (Max Success Pro Cycling) was the first to unseat Sullivan from the top spot; her time of 11.058 just a hundredth of a second faster. With Britain’s Victoria Williamson and Jessica Varnish both easing through to the 1/16 finals with a times of 11.201 and 11.111 respectively, attention reverted to the up and coming Dutch prodigy, Elis Ligtlee. And Ligtlee certainly did light up the track, posting a time of 10.805. With the reigning world sprint champion, Lin Junhong (CHI) crossing the line ninth in 11.179, Ligtlee finished the fastest by a whole quarter of a second.

Women’s Individual Sprint Qualifying - Results

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS 10.805
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING 11.058
3 Monique SULLIVAN  CANADA 11.069
4 Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG 11.097
5 Olga ISMAYILOVA  AZERBAIJAN 11.100
6 Jessica VARNISH  GREAT BRITAIN 11.111
7 Tania CALVO BARBERO  SPAIN 11.129
8 Victoria TYUMNEVA  RUSSIA 11.131
9 Lin JUNHONG  CHINA 11.179
10 Victoria WILLIAMSON  GREAT BRITAIN 11.201
11 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA 11.294
12 Caitlin WARD  AUSTRALIA 11.334
13 Helena CASAS ROIGE  SPAIN 11.354
14 Olivia MONTAUBAN  FRANCE 11.379
15 Kayono MAEDA  JAPAN PROFESSIONAL CYCLISTS ASSOCIATION 11.421
16 Katie SCHOFIELD  NEW ZEALAND 11.444

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/16 Finals

The 24 qualifiers were pitted in 12 heats with all the finals going to form with the exception of Calvo Barbero who was relegated due to obstructing her competitor’s line, allowing Sandie Clair of France to progress through to the 1/8 finals. Surprisingly, the tightest final was between Ligtlee and the slowest qualifier, Melissa Erickson, of the USA. Ligtlee progressed to the final by just two hundredths of a second.

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/16 Finals – Heat Winners Progressing to 1/8 Finals

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
3 Monique SULLIVAN  CANADA
4 Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG
5 Olga ISMAYILOVA  AZERBAIJAN
6 Jessica VARNISH  GREAT BRITAIN
7 Sandie CLAIR  FRANCE
8 Victoria TYUMNEVA  RUSSIA
9 Lin JUNHONG  CHINA
10 Victoria WILLIAMSON  GREAT BRITAIN
11 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA
12 Caitlin WARD  AUSTRALIA      

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/8 Finals

With just 12 riders remaining in six heats, the tension was palpable as riders’ sought to avoid losing their heat and being forced to ride in the much maligned repechages. Ligtlee progressed on her journey to knock Ward out to take the first spot in the quarter finals, with Shuang doing the same in the second heat.

British fans will be pleased with Williamson’s performance in the next heat who succeeded in pushing the favoured Canadian rider into the repechages by less than two hundredths of a second. Sadly, Varnish could not emulate the performance of her British teammate and ended up losing to Clair of France in her heat.

Lee will undoubtedly be ecstatic to progress through to the quarter finals after beating the world champion, Junghong, by just a thousandth of a second whilst Ismayilova was victorious against Tyumeva in arguably the most exciting heat of the round.

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/8 Finals – Heat Winners Progressing to Quarter Finals

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
3 Victoria WILLIAMSON  GREAT BRITAIN
4 Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG
5 Olga ISMAYILOVA  AZERBAIJAN
6 Sandie CLAIR  FRANCE

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/8 Finals – Repechages Heats

There were two heats in the repecharges, and the first heat saw Jessica Varnish pitted against Caitlin Ward of Australia and Lin Junhong of China. Varnish put on a fine display to take command in the race to cross the line with a significant advantage. The second heat saw the Cuban rider, Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez, just edge out the Canadian, Monique Sullivan with Victoria Tyumneva of Russia finishing in third place.

Women’s Individual Sprint - 1/8 Finals – Repechages Heats Winners Progressing to Quarter Finals

1 Jessica VARNISH  GREAT BRITAIN
2 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA

Women’s Individual Sprint - Quarter Finals

It took just two rounds to decide the winner of the first heat with Ligtlee pitted against Guerra Rodriguez. Despite Guerra’s best attempts to get past in the closing lap in the first race, Ligtlee proved too strong for the Cuban and crossed the line 0.14 ahead. The second race saw Ligtlee take an even more convincing victory.

Varnish rejuvenated British interest with a win in her first heat against Shuang. However, heartbreakingly for Varnish who had already got into the finals the hard way, Guo took the next two races to knock Varnish into the race for 5th to 8th place.

Varnish’s teammate, Williamson, sadly suffered the same fate in her match against France’s Clair. Although victorious in the first race, Clair proved two strong in the remaining two races and progressed through to the semifinals.

The fourth race saw Lee easily overcome her component, Ismayilova, in just two races.

Women’s Individual Sprint - Quarter Finals – Heat Winners Progressing to Semifinals

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
3 Sandie CLAIR  FRANCE
4 Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG

Women’s Team Pursuit – First Round

The odd nature of qualifying for the gold medal final meant the winning teams in heats three and four were the only ones who were able to qualify for the gold medal final. China, who had been fastest in qualifying, took the first place in the final with a time of 4:33.591 – some two seconds quicker than they had been in qualification.

However, it was the Australians who took the second spot in the gold medal final – perhaps by surprise. They beat the Italian team who had been faster than them in qualifying, and managed a ride some nine seconds faster than their earlier ride, clocking 4:28.278 meaning they qualify for the final as favourites to win.

Italy got the consolation of qualifying for the final by posting the fourth fastest qualifying time whilst a much improved United States team who were in the unenviable position of starting first took the second spot in the bronze medal final with a fast time of 4:29.904 – eleven seconds faster than their qualifying time the previous evening.

Women’s Team Pursuit – First Round Results

Heat 3

1 AUSTRALIA (Macey STEWART, Elissa WUNDERSITZ, Alexandra MANLY, Lauren PERRY) 4:28.278 (qualify for gold medal final)
2 ITALY (FRAPPORTI Simona, Beatrice BARTELLONI, Tatiana GUDERZO, Silva VALSECCHI) 4:32.098 (qualify for bronze medal final due to having fourth fastest time)

Heat 4

1 CHINA (Dong Yan HUANG, Di JIN, Hongyu LIANG, Zhao BAOFANG) 4:33.591 (qualify for gold medal final)
2 HONG KONG (Bo Yee LEUNG, Zhao Juan MENG, Yao PANG, Qianyu YANG) 4:35.432

Remaining teams in time order:

1 UNITED STATES 4:29.904 (qualify for bronze medal final due to having third fastest time)
2 BELARUS 4:34.359
3 GERMANY 4:35.178
4 New Zealand 4:40.403

Men’s Omnium I – 15km Scratch Race

the first event of the omnium was the 60 lap 15km scratch race. Only two riders in the current top 10 World Cup standings lined up at the start with Casper Pedersen of Denmark, lying in second place in the competition, the favourite to take the title. It is just Pedersen, ninth placed Tim Veldt and eleventh placed Jasper de Buyst who have the potential to pass Bobby Lea’s 61 point lead.

An uneventful scratch race followed, and it was eventually Germany’s Maximilian Beyer who crossed the line first with a measured performance with Belgian’s De Buyst grabbing valuable points in second place. Cameron Karwowski of New Zealand took third place. Veldt took third place, whilst Pedersen will undoubtedly be disappointed with seventh place. Oliver Wood, the sole British representation in the Cali omnium competition, sadly came in in 21st position.

Men’s Omnium I – 15km Scratch Race Results

1 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY
2 Jasper DE BUYST BELGIUM
3 Cameron KARWOWSKI  NEW ZEALAND
4 Tim VELDT  NETHERLANDS
5 Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND
6 Ondrej RYBIN  CZECH REPUBLIC
7 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK
8 Unai ELORRIAGA ZUBIAUR  SPAIN
9 Kazushige KUBOKI  JAPAN
10 Gideoni MONTEIRO  BRAZIL

Men’s Omnium II – 4km Individual Pursuit

The 24 men in the omnium competition were up to put themselves against the clock in the next round of the omnium competition. Ionnis Spanopoulos of Greece set the initial bar in the first heat with a time of 4:38.765; a time which would surely be challenged very early on in the competition.

This turned out to be the case, and it was British rider, Oliver Wood, who unseated Spanopoulos in the second round, clocking a very respectable time of 4:34.449 and catching his Sam Welford of Australia on the line. Both Raman Tsishkou of Belarus and Chun Wing Leung of China threatened the 4:30 barrier in heats three and four respectively, but it was not until the eleventh heat when the mark was passed by both Cameron Karwowski of New Zealand and Tim Veldt of the Netherlands. Veldt, who is part of the record holding Dutch team pursuit squad, as well as a regular podium finisher in the individual event in the national championships, started cautiously to finish his ride with two 15 second laps, clocking 4:25.233. Karwowski was timed as 4:29.049 in the same heat.

The final heat was also a competitive affair, with scratch race winner, Beyer, taking the virtual heat in the pursuit round for the first three kilometres. However, a fade in the final kilometre saw him lose the lead not only back to Veldt, but also to his heat compatriate, De Buyst, to cross the line in a still impressive 4:28.085. De Buyst took the advantage from Beyer in the final three laps, to steal second place in the pursuit competition with a time of 4:27.229.

Men’s Omnium II – 4km Individual Pursuit Results

1 Tim VELDT  NETHERLANDS 4:25.233
2 Jasper DE BUYST  BELGIUM 4:27.229
3 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY 4:28.085
4 Cameron KARWOWSKI  NEW ZEALAND 4:29.049
5 Chun Wing LEUNG  HONG KONG 4:30.457
6 Raman TSISHKOU  BELARUS  4:30.574
7 Unai ELORRIAGA ZUBIAUR  SPAIN 4:31.232
8 Martyn IRVINE  IRELAND 4:32.136
9 Thomas BOUDAT  FRANCE 4:32.264
10 Viktor MANAKOV  RUSSIA 4:32.277

Men’s Keirin

The Keirin is always one of the most anticipated events of the World Cup, and the early heats did not disappoint. Great Britain’s Lewis Oliva took a decisive win in the first heat, with Maximilian Levy finishing comfortably ahead of his competition in the second heat. The third heat, however, did not go to plan. A burst tyre caused one of the event favourites, Francois Pervis, to crash out – taking the Azerbaijan rider, Sergiy Omelchenko, down with him. Whilst Pervis was able to get up unaided, Omelchenko had to be taken away on a stretcher. Josiah Ng Onn Lam of Malaysia went on to win the depleted heat. Yuta Wakimoto (Japan Professional Cycling Association) took the win in the fourth heat, with Shane Perkins of Jayco AIS taking the final spot in the second round with a win in the fifth heat.

Men’s Keirin - Heat Winners Progressing to Second Round

1 Lewis Alexander OLIVA  GREAT BRITAIN
2 Maximilian LEVY  GERMANY
3 Josiah NG ONN LAM  MALAYSI
4 Yuta WAKIMOTO  JAPAN PROFESSIONAL CYCLING ASSOCIATION
5 Shane PERKINS  JAYCO AIS

Men’s Keirin - First Round Repechages

The first heat was comfortably taken by Simon Van Velthooven of New Zealand, whilst Matthew Baranoski (USA) impressively snatched the win from Matthijs Buchli of the Netherlands on the line. Christos Volikakis of Greece won the third heat with an impressive turn of speed in the final lap.

The fourth round was eerily reminiscent of the earlier qualifying heats, sadly. Another puncture took out both Eoin Mullen of Ireland and Hodei Mazquiaran Uria of Spain. Emerson Harwood of Australia took the win – and was also the only rider to finish the heat on his bicycle: Bot mullen and Mazquiaran Uria walked across the line to claim the points.

The fifth heat had a notable absentee: Francois Pervis chose not to ride having been involved in the accident in the earlier heats. Kamil Kuczynski of Poland took the win. The other accident victim, Sergiy Omelchenko, was also a non-starter in the final heat which was taken by Kazunari Watanabe.

Men’s Keirin - First Round Repechages Winners Progressing to Second Round

1 Simon VAN VELTHOOVEN  NEW ZEALAND
2 Matthew BARANOSKI  UNITED STATES
3 Christos VOLIKAKIS  GREECE
4 Emerson HARWOOD  AUSTRALIA
5 Kamil KUCZYNSKI  POLAND
6 Kazunari WATANABE

Men’s Team Pursuit – First Round

The last event of the evening was the slightly controversial first round of the men’s team pursuit and, with the weather taking a turn for the worst, the conditions on the track were verging on dangerous.

Great Britain were off in the first heat, and a tight race ensued with the Spanish squad. After a fast opening lap, the Spanish edged ahead of the British team and were a sixth of a second ahead just after halfway. However, the development squad showed just how far they have developed from the qualifying heats of the previous day and, by 3000m, had closed the gap with the Spanish. Two 14 second closing laps were enough to seal victory in the heat by two seconds (4:03.268).

Rusvelo, who had posted the third time in qualification, took victory in the first of the heats to decide which teams should qualify for the gold medal final; the Germans fading in the final lap to post a time of 4:04.505 against Rusvelo’s fast-for-conditions 4:01.702.

The tightest pursuit heat of the match followed, with Australia pitted against Denmark. Denmark faded in the closing stages however, and despite a 14 second closing lap, were unable to take the lead back from the Australians who took the second spot in the gold medal final with a time of 4:03.409. The Danes had the consolation of posting one of the fastest two rides outside the gold medal qualifying teams’ times (4:03.622) to take a spot in the bronze medal final. And the other team to take the bronze medal place? Great Britain with their excellent ride in the first heat.

Men’s Team Pursuit – First Round Results

Heat 3

1 RUSVELO (Artur ERSHOV, Alexander EVTUSHENKO, Alexey KURBATOV, Alexander SEROV) 4:01.702 (qualify for gold medal final)
2 GERMANY (Henning BOMMEL, Theo REINHARDT, Kersten THIELE, Dominic WEINSTEIN) 4:04.505

Heat 4

1 AUSTRALIA (Scott LAW, Joshua HARRISON, Jackson LAW, Tirian MCMANUS) 4:03.409 (qualify for gold medal final)
2 DENMARK (Daniel HARTVIG, Anders HOLM, Rasmus Christian QUAADE, Casper VAN FOLSACH) 4:03.622 (qualify for bronze medal final due to having fourth fastest time)

Remaining teams in time order:

1 GREAT BRITAIN 4:03.268 (qualify for bronze medal final due to having third fastest time)
2 SPAIN 4:05.309
3 RUSSIA 4:05.486
4 BELGIUM 4:06.000

 
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